CHILDREN’S MOTOR RESPONSES TO MUSIC

Today we’d love to talk about one of the ways in which we get more in touch with our students’ musical learning progress: the observation of their motor responses to music.

Some of the easiest reactions to notice are the little legs (or little hands) moving to the beat. Finding ourselves moving when we listen to music happens to all of us, most of the time unconsciously.
Rhythm, although, is something that gets stable later in the age (if properly supported).

So, how should we consider these little movements showed by the children during the sessions?
We should remember that children’s body movement is in resonance with what they’re listening to, namely the music that surrounds them.

We can say that music moves the child even before the child knows it.

Children move unconsciously, in a space that is specially created for their freedom to experiment.

Furthermore, during the sessions, we can often observe children swaying with their whole bodies to the beat, shifting the weight from one leg to another, most of the time accordingly to the tempo and the speed of the music. Their centre of gravity is perfectly linked to the ground.

What else can we observe? 
Children move, run, jump. They fall. 
We can pay attention and notice exactly when that happens. We will then see that children fall on the musical cadences; at the end of the musical phrases; or at the end of the songs, meaning that they are constantly listening and following the music (even if they’re not looking at us).

Now is the moment to ask you… have you ever observed your students’ movement? Have you ever paid attention to these details? 
By doing it, you will be able to evaluate children’s rhythm development in a very natural way.

Why don’t you try to catch their motor responses in your next sessions and share with us your discoveries? 
You can describe them here in the comments or use the hashtag #firststepsinmusic on Instagram (remember to tag @gordonukinstitute so it will be easier for us to find you).

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